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Carol Fennelly papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS2153

Collection Scope and Content

This collection contains correspondence, brochures, videos, films, photographs, newspaper articles, financial records, speeches, and invitations. This material covers the years 1971-96. This material relates to the work of homeless rights activist Carol Fennelly and Mitch Snyder as part of the Community for Creative Non-Violence (CCNV). CCNV began in the early 1970s as an anti-war group and evolved into an organization that provides food, clothing, shelter, and educational programs for the poor and homeless. Snyder and Fennelly employed non-violent confrontational protest tactics aimed at shocking the public and drawing media attention to the cause of homelessness. A portion of these papers relate to the organizations Housing Now and the Trust for Affordable Housing and the work done on behalf of homeless residents of Washington, D.C.

Dates

  • 1971-1997

Creator

Restrictions on Access

Some records may be restricted.

Restrictions on Use

Some material may be copyrighted or restricted. It is the patron's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other case restrictions when publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the collections.

Biographical Note

Carol Fennelly, a long-time activist, is Director of Hope House. For seventeen years Carol lived and worked at the homeless shelters operated by the Community for Creative Non-Violence. In that capacity she was responsible for the creation of numerous new programs within the organization, including a drop-in center for homeless people, a medical infirmary for 30 homeless men, and recruitment and overall coordination of seven separate organizations which provided services in the 1400 bed Federal City Shelter. Carol is the architect of the Districts "cooling centers" which have saved lives by providing cool places for indigent people during extremely hot weather. She is founder and president of the Trust for Affordable Housing which built over 350 units of Single Room Occupancy Housing for single homeless people in the District of Columbia. In addition, her reputation as an outspoken and effective advocate on issues of concern to homeless people is well known. Along with Mitch Snyder she designed campaigns which won voting rights for homeless people; won passage of the Stewart B. McKinney bill; won passage of the D.C. Right to Overnight Shelter Act; brought a quarter million people to Washington for the Housing Now! March in 1989; and acquired the old Federal City College along with $13 million in renovation funds to create a model shelter in the nation's capitol. She founded Hope House after spending almost a year writing about the plight of families torn apart by the closure of Lorton Prison.

this history came from the Hope House website. http://www.hopehousedc.org/about/about-us.htm

Extent

21.5 Linear Feet

Language

English

Abstract

Collection contains correspondence, brochures, videos, films, photographs, newspaper articles, financial records, speeches, and invitations from 1971-1996 relating to the work of homeless rights activist Carol Fennelly and Mitch Snyder as part of the Community for Creative Non-Violence (CCNV).

Collection Organization

Organized into fourteen series: Correspondence, Demonstrations, Ephemera, Entertainment, Financial records, Graphics, Housing, Newspaper articles, Publicity and publications, Speaking engagements, Speeches, Subject files, Video and audio materials, and Oversize materials.

Acquisition Information

These papers were donated to Gelman Library by Carol Fennelly in 1994.
Title
Guide to the Carol Fennelly papers, 1971-1997
Status
Completed
Author
Special Collections Research Center, The George Washington University
Date
2006
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Research Center, The George Washington University Repository

Contact:
2130 H Street NW
Washington 20052 United States of America